Infographics: No Longer If, But How

Infographics are no longer “if we have the time and budget,” but “how do we make ours inform and engage.” Engagement is increased markedly if a picture is included.  Content that includes images produces 6 times more engagement than text-only posts.  Infographics add engagement, impact and clarity to the information you are presenting.

What Are Infographics.  An infographic is a way to visually represent information or data.  In the simplest form, data plus pictures equals infographic. With a minimalist design and a simplified concept, infographics can translate scientific data, represent market need and/or demonstrate strategy.   In short, infographics are tools to communicate information.

Why Use Infographics.  Infographics lower barriers.  With information overload an ongoing challenge, infographics offer an efficient use of the audience’s time.   We are visual beings that are much more likely to be captivated by images instead of text paragraphs. When it comes to remembering large amounts of information, we tend to remember it better when it is displayed visually.

Which Information to Include.    Infographics can include science, market and/or strategy.  For example, an infographic can be used to convey an indication, market size, geographic reach, products and/or pipeline. In terms of the format, use four or five illustrations with appropriate captions.  Remember, just as too many words can overwhelm a written piece, too many graphics can sink an infographic.  The goal is to communicate information, using the least number of words.

How to Use.  Infographics can accompany press releases, articles, fact sheets, social media posts and more. Infographics boost comprehension, have viral potential, offer engagement and easier data presentation.

Still not convinced?  For our client LEO Science & Tech Hub, a company exploring cutting-edge science and technology opportunities with relevance for dermatology, we used an infographic as part of a press release resulting in 2,113 views. For our client Oticon, launching an innovative hearing device, we developed an infographic that helped secure a front page spot on USA Today.

Visuals are a welcome addition to text.  If you want to engage with an audience and lower communication barriers, infographics are a smart “how to.”

 

After the Conference: Four Fundamental Follow-Throughs

Conferences are all-important opportunities for in-person conversations with investors, partners, prospects and others. Gearing up, scheduling meetings and ensuring up-to-date materials can absorb a lot of bandwidth in advance of the conference itself. However, unless you commit to spending an equal amount of time after the conference to follow through, the time spent up front will not have the intended impact.

Here are the four fundamental follow-throughs after a conference:

Make a Record of Important Conversations. Whether this is the first meeting, or another in a continued dialogue, make a record of the conversation. The record does not need to be a one-page document a
nd in fact is best as a summary. We recommend an introductory sentence, “First-time meeting with Taylor, holds position in PeerCo.” Then one or two bullets, “Will continue to monitor OurCo, in particular interested in pipeline.” With the final bullet summarizing next steps, “Make sure to reach out for next West Coast trip.”

Follow through on Commitments. Did you promise to make an introduction? Send a scientific study? Promises are meant to be kept. Jot down all deliverables in real time to ensure follow-through upon return to the office. Once back at your desk, ensure commitments are made within a reasonable time frame. That doesn’t necessarily mean the very next day as the other conference attendees are similarly re-engaging in their day-to-day work, but within a period commensurate with the request.

Stay Connected and Monitor News. Staying connected does not always mean sending a specific follow-up. Rather, it can mean noting a future conference at which you will connect, following the company for news and/or making a social media connection through Twitter or LinkedIn as appropriate.

Capture Insights into the Event. Make sure you write down anything you wish you had known prior to the conference as well as things you would have done differently. You may think you’ll remember next year, but you won’t. Was the conference productive? Do you want to participate again next year? Maybe you missed an early bird registration and/or were shut out of a favored hotel? These are all good notes to ensure you are prepared for the following year.

Sure, the pre-conference activities are important to ensure a successful trip, but don’t take your foot off the pedal once you return to the office. Commit to spend time after the conference to optimize the value of your on-site presence.

Initial Public Offering: A Fleeting Thought or a Fast-Moving Plan

Last year was a record year for biotech with the NASDAQ Biotechnology Index up 65.61% and the S&P Biotech Index up 48.4%.  Performance in the biotech sector beat out the S&P 500 which was up 29.6% and NASDAQ which was up 38.3%, both of which were at record highs.

This year got off to a hot start, too, with 29 life science companies going public in Q1.

Still, many companies thinking about it remain on the sidelines due to past volatility of the markets, demands of “living in a fish bowl,” and the costs associated with being public.

If you’re thinking about it, here are some things to think about:

ipo infographic

Preparation Phase. Choosing your partners can take a few months. Investment bankers will help determine fair value for your company and its brand, choose the ideal time to go public and conduct due diligence to verify the financial information, your market and technology/product story to determine how it will resonate with investors. Legal counsel leads SEC filings and responses, corporate governance issues and contracts. Corporate and public relations counsel will provide a roadmap for building value for your health science innovations such as how to craft messaging around corporate milestones and dissemination and coverage. This phase is about storytelling and connecting your brand to the right stakeholders that matter to you most.  The right investor audiences are important in this phase but so are the influencers with whom investors rely on for their information such as Key Opinion Leaders in the medical community.

Registration Phase. Considerations in choosing the right exchange for you should include stock liquidity, process and timeline of going public, valuation, regulatory environment and the listing standards and fees.  You will also want to come up with the company story for your roadshow.  You should be prepared to tell a compelling equity story with a clear message about how IPO proceeds will be used to fund growth and how your strong management and advisory teams are positioned to bring success in the future.  Is your message clear, consistent, sustainable and supportable?  Speaking of management, identify your company spokesperson and consider training that individual to improve on their verbal and nonverbal communication skills.

Marketing Phase. Bankers will be training their salesforce to sell your stock and you and your CFO will hit the road.  The roadshow, where the bankers will take your senior management team on a whirlwind tour, will begin, and the bankers will start to build the order book where they will compile a list of interested buyers.   At this point you will also want to get investor relations professional’s input on investor allocations.

Check out our next blog about developing your communications process post-IPO.